Category Archives: Sherry Reads

What’s in a name? A cup of ‘Joe’ by any other name…

Have you ever wondered why coffee is known as “a cup of joe”? Of the Daniel, David, John and Michael(s), why Joe?

According to an article published by Quartz, “Joe” is short for Josephus Daniels (1862-1948), former secretary of the US Navy.

Former US secretary of Navy, Josephus Daniels (image credit: electricscotland.com)

Daniels became secretary of Navy under President Woodrow Wilson. In an effort to establish strict morality, Daniels banned the consumption of alcohol.

In a new biography, “Josephus Daniels: His Life and Time,” Lee A. Craig wrote:

As a substitute, stewards increased their purchases of coffee, among other beverages, and Daniels’s name became linked to the daily drink of millions around the world. Continue reading

Bring ‘MAN-ly’ back with this hunky… CHIN

Work out the tris, pecs and lats, none speak louder of your manhood than having a strong jaw. In an article published by Details magazine, “Is Your Jaw Man Enough?” (Sept. 2014), it reports that the number men seeking jaw augmentation — injecting cosmetic fillers into the jaw — has increased 32% in 2013, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS). The ASAP observed in its 2013 statistical data:

Men had more than 1 million cosmetic procedures, 9.4% of the total. The number of cosmetic procedures for men increased over 273% from 1997.

Read previous blog post: Youth-obsessed, Look and Feel Young

Viktor & Rolf Spicebomb (image credit: the perfume expert/Viktor&Rolf)

A round of treatment, consisting of six vials ($1,500 per vial of filler), costs $9,000. The benefit? A manly jaw attracts women and men alike. Women see the trait as a sign of health, gene quality, strength and reproductive potential — a virile sex machine. As for men, strong jaw signals that submission, “This man is a leader.” The top six most desirable men, jaw-based of course. (Details magazine) Continue reading

Aging in a youth-obsessed society, the battle to look and feel young

Our society celebrates youth. Youth equates beauty, creativity, energy, fun and delicious cool. Even in the media, lists such as Forbes‘ and TIME‘s 30 Under 30 elevate those who succeeds when they are very young.

Women obsess over looking younger, whereas men obsess over feeling younger (image credit: Beautifulforever Aesthetic Laser Center)

In an article titled “Women would rather hear they look young than slim” (DailyMail), the following list was posted:

  • Two thirds of women use anti-aging products
  • One fifth worry about their age every day
  • 41% wish they look younger
  • 39.5 years old is when women are most worried about how old they look

Interestingly, while women obsess over their appearance (as evidenced by anti-aging specialist Uzzi Reiss’ book title, Natural Hormone Balance for Women: Look Younger, Feel Stronger, and Live Life with Exuberance), men strive to feel younger. Continue reading

Millennials read more than those over 30! (not really…)

Un- or under-employed, and employed millennials alike have been called superficial, self-obsessed (Read GenTwenty column here), but according to a new Pew Research Center study, they have one redeeming virtue. The millennials are reading more than their over-30 counterparts.

I did a little dance when I read this. Despite our proclivity for social sharing (oh selfies), we are after all literary. The sophisticate of our young minds, we…

My euphoria immediately dissipated the moment I read the next line, as reported by Quartz:

Some 88% of Americans younger than 30 said they read a book in the past year compared with 79% of those older than 30.

ONE book. We beat the older generation because an additional 9% of us read one book last year?

Millennials read more than the older generation (image credit: www.theteatalk.com)

Are millennials reading?

If yes, from where and what and how are they reading?

According to a study by McKinsey, a global management consulting firm based in the UK, the average person consume 72 minutes of news a day, and the increase was driven predominantly by people under the age of 35.

Nevertheless, millennials are reading differently. The Associated Press (AP) found that millennials are more versatile as information gatherers, and do not rely solely on newspaper for news. 

They [younger consumers] consume news across a multitude of platforms and sources, all day, constantly. Among the key touch points in the new environment are online video, blogs, online social networks, mobile devices RSS, word of mouth, Web portals and search engines.

Furthermore, according to the same AP study, millennials not want to be informed, but they want information that are relevant and shareable.

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Boys take note, King Arthur said, “Let her decide”

The adventures of the legendary King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table definitely add a masculine glamour to medieval histories. The story, based on Geoffrey of Monmouth’s imaginative History of the Kings of Britain, first gain popularity in the 12th century, Although there are other versions of King Arthur (characters and events vary), Geoffrey’s version serve as the basis for them.

The Green Knight, illustration (image credit: Sphere Magazine)

The Green Knight, illustration (image credit: Sphere Magazine)

The story that piqued my interest has nothing to do with adventures or fighting, but more of a lesson on relationship. When I first heard the story, I cracked up. From then to present, this message, Keep your woman happy. Let her decide, still rings true.   

Curious? Here’s how the story goes.

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For all foodies, read McGee’s “On Food and Cooking”

Many good ideas start with a simple, “why?”. Harold McGee’s On Food and Cooking, first published in 1984, comes from wondering about questions such as: Why do eggs solidify when we cook them? Why do we use brown sugars in certain cookies? While the first edition emphasizes the relevance of cells and molecules to cooking, the second edition (2004) has been expanded to cover a greater range of ingredients and their preparation methods. McGee’s work, unmatched in accuracy, is a kitchen classic.

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For all foodies alike (self-proclaimed included), The Science of Good Cooking from America’s Test Kitchen

Winter is reserved for the following pleasures:

  • Layering – bundle up and embrace your marshmallow identity
  • Festivities – Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year, CNY
  • FOOD FOOD FOOD

If you cook or like to cook and/or eat, I highly recommend The Science of Good Cooking (Cook’s Illustrated Cookbook).

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The original Mary Poppins is not so supercalifragilisticexpialidocious!

Many of us are probably familiar with Disney’s 1964 musical-film starring Julie Andrew as the delightful, simply wonderful nanny, Mary Poppins. While Disney’s Mary Poppins is indeed supercalifragilisticexpialidocious (even more so with her philosophy that “a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down”), you would be missing out if you have never met the original Mary Poppins.

Written by P.L. Travers with illustrations by Mary Shepard, Mary Poppins is the world’s most beloved nanny. Arriving at Number Seventeen Cherry-Tree Lane with great style — blown over by the East Wind, Mary Poppins brings adventure, enchantment and excitement to the Banks house (and to you)!

Mary Poppins (written by P.L. Travers with illustrations by Mary Shepard)

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