Tag Archives: Boston

New England Road Trip #1: Boston, History and Best-Value Italian

Boston, New England’s largest cosmopolitan city, has much to offer. First, it is rich in history. The 2.5-mile Freedom Trail that snakes through town ensures, most definitely, that you will not leave this city without getting a lesson on the American Revolution. Second, it is exciting. Home to the Boston Red Sox, you, if you are a Red Sox fan, will die for a chance to pay homage to Fenway Park. Supposedly the Red Sox got “cursed” after they traded pitcher Babe Ruth to the Yankees in 1920s. Nonetheless, the Red Sox exorcised “The Curse” by winning the World Series in 2004, and again in 2007. Third, it is refined. The city’s renowned universities and cultural institutions gain Boston the title of “the Athens of America.”

Gov Center, markets

With so much to do, what should I do? If you, like me, have only one day in Boston, consider devoting the day to Freedom Trail. Start from Boston Common, the oldest public park in the United States. Then walk to City Hall and grab lunch at adjoining Faneuil Market, which is the name given to all five buildings in this shopping complex (images, below). Lastly, finish your walk in the North End (aka Little Italy). Here, you can visit the Old North Church of “One if by land, two if by sea” as well as grab great Italian foods.

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New England Road Trip and Discovering the Much Romanticized Notion of Being “On the Road”

Viva la road trip! The advent of automobile paired with highway building and cheap gas prices ($0.60 per gallon!) in the 50s meant greater mobility. One could travel great distance in a car compared to horse-drawn carriages.

The drive to go places, to search for something else¬†is best exemplified by Jack Kerouac’s autobiographical¬†On the Road, which captures the essence of the “Beat” sensibility. Despite the fact that Kerouac depicts the Beat generation as “so lonely, so sad, so tired, so quivering, so broken, so beat,” to be “on the road” is largely romanticized and the book portrays the American landscape as expansive and beautiful.

Credit: online image, busbank.com

Credit: online image, busbank.com

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